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Full text of "Canadian Architecture and Design - 2009"

A Canadian T"^v 

Architecture & Design 



MARCH/APRIL 2009 



cadmag.ca 






*T*a 



andrew 

richard 

designs 



Fine Outdoor Furniture 



livefresh 



livelife 




head office showroom 

4940 Sheppard Ave., East 
Toronto, ON 

downtown showroom 

310 King St., East 
Toronto ON 

www.andrewricharddesigns.com 





V 




ON DISCERNING TASTE 



LATE NIGHT DINING 



THERE'S SOMETHING WONDERFUL aboul a late night dinner, when no reservations 
are needed. The intimacy. The company of insiders. The spontaneous swapping of stories and 
seats at the table. The impromptu pleasure of lingering over a meal long after the day players 
have gone to bed 



GREY GOOSE 

World's Host 'Hist Jul; \odkii 



Enjov Responsibly. g« i goose »»d tw hwy goosi otvict «« nfesiEimi trmemmks vow* w\ aic n vounc 



Canadian T"^\ 

RCHITECTURE & DESIGN 



MARCH/APRIL 2009 




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On the Cover: A Yorkville 

Condo receives the 

Lori Morris touch. See page 70 

Clockwise from top: 
Sarah Richardson (pace 48), 
a Toronto kitchen bv Dee Dee 
Taylor Hannah (pace 62) and 
cuest room by lori morris 
(pace 70). 



48 Sarah Richardson 

HEADING FOR COTTAGE COUNTRY 

52 Powerhouse Designers 

THE COUNTRY'S BEST, FROM BOB'S 
YOUR UNCLE TO POWELL & BONNELL 

54 Balancing Act 

A BURNABY RENO DESIGNED BY 
BYU'S ADA BONINI BLENDS 
FORMALITY WITH FAMILY FUN 

62 Practical Elegance 

A TORONTO COURTYARD HOUSE 
BY DEE DEE TAYLOR HANNAH 
EMBODIES THE BEST OF OLD AND 
NEW DESIGN 



70 Let the sun shine in 

SOOTHING COLOURS, WARM TEXTURES 
AND DESIGNER LORI MORRIS'S LIGHT 
TOUCH TRANSFORM A TORONTO 
CONDO 

78 Peace Above It All 

A VANCOUVER PENTHOUSE BY 
DESIGNER MITCHELL FREEDLAND 
EVOKES HARMONY AND CALM 
AMID SOARING VIEWS OF ENGLISH BAY 

85 Sophistication By The Shore 

A RUSTIC GETAWAY IN THE 
MUSKOKAS GETS AN UPSCALE 
MAKEOVER BY BIG CITY DESIGNERS 
POWELL & BONNELL 

94 Unifying Forces 

METICULOUS ATTENTION TO DETAIL BY 
DESIGNER ROBERT LEDINGHAM 
LEND HEART AND SOUL TO A 
VANCOUVER HOME 



4 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 



It's not about modernism. 



It's about magnetism. 




m 




ieg 



ZZl 



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---■' " 



be your first impression of the new BMW 7 Series? What about your second? Your third? 
discover each experience brings a new reward. Maybe you'll admire its meticulously sculpted silhouette 
designed to captivate and inspire. Perhaps you'll be drawn to its elongated hood that exudes both authority 
and elegance. Regardless, you'll be constantly reminded this is no mere luxury sedan. But rather, the next 
iteration of a monumental flagship re-imagmed in everyway. The new BMW 7 Series. The Statement. 



• new 
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The Ultimate 
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Departments 




^O resort: 

The Islands that time forgot 



MARCH/APRIL 2009 



Volume 2, Issue 2 

Canadian Architecture 

& Design Magazine 

1 34 Mill Street 

Creemore, ON LOM 1 CO, 

is published bimonthly by 

Dauphin Media Croup 

www.dauphinmedia.com 



CAYMAN ISLANDS 



14 illumination: 

Autumn Leaves Alight 
form and function come 
together 

16 literature: 

Architectural Excellence 
500 iconic buildings 

18 cheers: 

Jackson-Triggs 

TAKES TOPS HONOURS AGAIN 




20 »„: 

Newfoundland landscapes 




tc^w kitchens: 

A trio of dream kitchens 
from top design firms 



22 automotive: 

2009 Ranger Rover Sport 
ADRENALINE ON THE ROAD 

104 PARTING shot: 
THE EIFFEL TOWER 




BATH - KITCHEN - HOUSEHOLD: 

What's new for your 
kitchen, bath and 
broom closet 



6 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 




Builder of 

a ward- win n ing 

custom homes 



555 Bloor St. East, Toronto, ON 
416.222.9433 • wilsonproject.ca 



EDITORS NOTE 



At long last the days are getting longer, and what this means for 
winter-weary Canadians is that little by little, as March slides 
into April, there will be more and more light in our lives. 

We wait a long time for the sun's return. And that's what the March/ 
April issue of Canadian Architecture & Design is really about: Light. 
Whether it's leaf-dappled sunshine pouring into a Muskoka getaway, 
dawn flooding a condo bedroom high over English Bay, the gleam of 
a polished kitchen counter, the glow of hope on the horizon in an art- 
ist's landscape, or the shimmer of bronze and gold in a stunning glass 
sculpture, light is what fills these pages. 

What's more, this issue is a tribute to a handful of respected design- 
ers from across the country. While their respective styles are as idio- 
syncratic and individual as they are, there is one thing they all share. 
And that is a commitment to brightening the places we live in, not 
just by bringing the outdoors in, but by using their magic to create 
the illusion of space and light, even when there is precious little out 
there. 

These pages also include a celebration of the two most functional 
rooms in the house: kitchen and bath. And, we have introduced two 
new features, one highlighting an artist we think you should know 
about, and the other, a book that will feed your inner architect and 
delight the designer in you. 

I hope you find something here that will bring light into your life. ♦ 




Warm Regards 
Cecily Ross 



next 



issue.. 



Pool & Patio Showcase 

Backyard Living Ideas 

Golf Course Architect 
Thomas McBroom is profiled. 





8 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 




Scavolini In Canada: 

Dekla Kitchens 1 220 Vo 

Rue de la Savane. /.BOO 

Boulevard, Vancouver Tel. 604 iludio S-S 

Ottawa Tel: 613-728 2027 

Scavolini in U.S.A.: 

U.S.A.: Phoenix, AZ Tel. 602.820.6354 Burlin 

CA Tel 626.432.1688 - Redwood City. CA Tel 

415.440.0210 - Tustin. CA Tel. 9 

Canaan, CT Tel. 860.824.1280 - 

Gables, FL Tel. 305.444.7383 - ( 

201.368.8400 - Las Vegas. NV Tel. 707.451.1645 - New 

Roslyn Heights, NY Tel 516.625.1350 San Antonio, TX .. 

WATel 206,624.845 - Milwaukee, Wl Tel. 412.258.1400 - 110 



/ Pasadena 

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ra, FL Tel. 305.792.V4V4 • Miami Coral 

el. 773.279.0050 - RoCheUe Park. N, Tel 

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Fax: +39 0721443413 conlaclfdscavoliniusa.com www.scavoIini.com 



CONTRIBUTORS 




Philip Castle- 
ton (Practi- 
cal Elegance) 

moved to Canada 
from the UK 
after completing 
his education at 
Wrekin and the 
University of 
York. He put down roots in Toronto ("in 
spite of the ghastly winters") and, after 
a stint as a cabinet maker, settled into 
commercial photography ("less dust"). 
Castleton travels throughout North 
America on photographic assignments 
for corporate clients. 



Janet Collins 

(Unifying 

Forces) 

Janet Collins is a 
British Columbia- 
based writer and 
associate editor at 
Canadian Inte- 
riors. Her work 



has appeared in Canadian Architect, Ca- 
nadian House and Home and Canadian 
Interiors. When she's not writing about 
design and architecture she spends her 
time creating fibre arts (weaving, felt and 
surface design). 




Sheree-Lee Olson (Balancing Act) 

^hbph^HH is a novelist and 





tat 



A 



editor of the 
Style section of 
The Globe and 
Mail. She traces 
her fascination 
with houses to 
her footloose 
childhood, 
growing up in 
Europe and across Canada. For the past 
two decades, home has been a narrow 
Victorian in Toronto's Parkdale district 
(she bought in before it was cool), but 
she still dreams of a modernist shed on 
the seashore. 



John Trigiani 
(Let the Sun 
Shine In) John's 
images are the 
careful work of a 
thoughtful artist 
whose photogra- 
phy creates a rich 
and sometimes 
surprising window of the world. John 
brings a tremendous sense of wonder and 
discovery to his work. His intuitive artis- 
tic touch and sense of design combine 
in every project he chooses. The shape, 
the texture, John's visceral feelings about 
what he sees guide each photograph. 
His technological expertise, along 
with his dedication to his subject often 
leads to images that resonate, creating 
a distinct mood and feeling. Over his 
illustrious 19 year career, John's images 
have garnered him an ever-lengthening 
client list featuring such prestigious 
names as The Gap, HMV, Chanel, To- 
ronto Life & Style and at Home magazine 
to name a few. * 




10 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 




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capturing the essence of Muskoka's dramatic landscape. 

1-800-294-2271 • (705) 765-1364 • info@tamaracknorth.com 
Gallery @ 1 005 Henshaw Lake Rd., Unit 4A, Port Carling, Ontario 





A Canadian _ T~~\ 

Architecture & Design 



• Lunch and Dinner daily 
■ Take out and Catering 

• Private Function facilities 

• live Entertainment on Weekends 



MC»wl Mr.fil>Tr.iMr«a t'ij»< . 

Tholoi Restaurant, in The Village at Blue Mountain 
170 JozoWeider Blvd. imhs) 
Collingwood ■ Tel: 705-443-83 11 



Reservations 
Recommended 




Hand caived Bath Stone in England 
by Neil Gray 

Complete Bespoke service 
Oil 44 1225 783558 

New 2009 Free Brochure 

Displays at 'A Stones Throw' 

Ajax, Ontario 

905.426.8556 

www.finessefireplaces.com 

www.a-slones-throw.ca 




Croup Publisher 

Mike Dunphy 

Editor 

Cecily Ross 

Creative Director 
April Cross 

Project Manager 

Charlie Ferguson 

IT Specialist 

Mat Dwyer 



Contributing Writers 

Janet Collins, Mickey Goodman, Danny Sinopoli, 
Rachel Hunter, Sheree-Lee Oslon, Cecily Ross, Kelly Cray 

Contributing Photographers 

Philip Castleton, Mike Dunphy, Corey Weiner, 
Ed White, Ted Yarwood, John Trigiani, Janice Nicolay 

National Sales 

Monique Welbourn 
Monzzi Media Inc. 

t. 416.937.1452 

monique@monzzi.com 



Canadian Architecture & Design Magazine 

1 34 Mill Street 

Creemore, ON LOM 1G0 

t. 705.466.9994 
f. 705.466.3313 

cadmag.ca 

Canadian Architecture & Design Magazine 

is published six times a year by Dauphin Media Group. 

Copyright 2009. All rights reserved. Printed in Canada. 

ISSN 1916-9868 

Reproduction without expressed written permission is prohibited. 

Canada Post Mail Agreement No. 41637016 

Postmaster send address changes/undeliverables to: 

Canadian Architecture & Design Magazine 

1 34 Mill Street 

Creemore, ON LOM ICO 

For Subscriptions: call 705.466.9994 

or e-mail subscriptions@cadmag.ca 

Letters to Editor: editor@cadmag.ca 

Unless specifically requested to do so by 

Canadian Architecture & Design Magazine 

in writing, manuscripts, photographs, and other materials 

submitted must be accompanied by a self-addressed envelope. 

Postage must be prepaid. 



lE'S^ROW 



Dauphin Media Group 



LIVE AND PLAY 




Spend the morning on the beach. Take a short trek along the trails to the charming town of Thornbury. Enjoy a glass at wine 
at The Raven Grill while overlooking the waters of Georgian Bay. With its endless amenities, social activities and dedicated 
staff, Lora Bay strikes the perfect balance of mind, body and soul. 

At the heart of the community is The Raven Golf Club at Lora Bay. host of the 2007 TELUS World Skins Game and 2009 
FordWiyne Gretzky Classic. 

Visit us today and see for yourself what life is like here. Golf, play and live life beyond par. 



For membership opportunities or 10 play the course call 519 599 7500. 
For real estate information call 519 599 1900. 



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RAVEN 

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AT LORA BAY 

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ILLUMINATION 



AUTUMN LEAVES ALIGHT 




orm and function come to- 
. gether like falling leaves in 
- this original take on a tra- 
ditional chandelier. The creation 
of glass artist Simon Peleg, the fix- 
ture evokes the tumbling sensation 
and bright hues of copper and gold 
leaves turning through sunny au- 
tumn skies. 



Each translucent, textured col- 
ored-glass pendant is suspended by 
a wire thread attached to a 36-inch 
long by 12-inch wide dark brown 
metal ceiling plate. Part fixture, 
part work of art, the light casts a 
magical, warm glow on any space. 

Peleg designed the piece for AM 
Studio, specialists in beautiful and 



original glass, porcelain and crystal 
chandeliers, fixtures and sconc- 
es. The light shown here sells for 
$2,500, but smaller versions with 
fewer pendants are also available. 

Available at AM Studio, 
121 Miranda Ave., Toronto. 
416-783-4100. www.amstudio.ca ♦ 
— Cecily Ross 



14 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE d DESIGN 



A SieM itlC Kitchen designed by BinnS is where intei design and architecture meet personal lifestyle. 
More i e choices than ever allow for a new dimension in kitchen interior design. Now the opportunities 

for desig i, materials, finishes and appointments are virtually limitless! The quality is unsurpassed. See for yourself 
at WWW.binnS.net and experience SieMatic Kitchens designed by Binns. 



416.286.2222 



www.binns.net 



kitchen + bath design 



LITERATURE 



ARCHITECTURAL EXCELLENCE: 
500 Iconic Buildings 

by Paul Cattermole (Firefly Books, $49.95. 512 pages, ISBN: 1554073588) 




The human architectural im- 
pulse has been around for 
5,000 years and it's all here in 
this coffee-table compendium of 500 
of the world's greatest buildings. Be- 
ginning with Turkey's ancient Cita- 
del of Uchisar (around 3,000 BC) and 
including Barcelona, Spain's, not-yet 
completed Sagrada Familia by Antoni 
Gaudi, Architectural Excellence pro- 



vides an encyclopedic review of ma- 
jor architectural styles through the 
ages - from Roman and Islamic, to 
Art Deco and Art Nouveau, to Mod- 
ernism and Deconstructionism. 

Each of the 500 entries celebrates a 
distinguished architect: Ustad Ahmad 
Lahauri (The Taj Mahal), Philip John- 
son (Glass House), Canada's Moshe 
Safdie (Habitat), Frank Lloyd Wright 



(Fallingbrook) and many more. Filled 
with lavish color photographs and 
written by London-based researcher 
Paul Cattermole, this is a book that 
will enlighten, entertain and inform. 

Available at books stores across 
Canada or visit www.amazon.com ♦ 

— Cecily Ross 



16 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 



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CHEERS 



Jackson-Triggs takes top 

honors at international wine festival — again 




With thewintergrapeharvest 
completed, Jackson-Triggs' 
winemakers Amy Bond 
and Marco Piccoli are taking time out 
to toast their phenomenal success at 
last year's International Wine and 
Spirit Competition. 

Named best Canadian winery at 
the London, Eng., event, Jackson- 
Triggs takes home the honor for the 
sixth time, bringing its "best winery" 
accolades to 19 in the past nine 
years. 

"This is one of the greatest honors 
in my winemaking career," says 
Piccoli. "What a terrific way for Amy 
and I to toast the completion of this 
year's harvest." 

Jackson-Trigg's icewines dominated 
the winery's medal winnings at the 
IWSC with its Proprietor's Reserve 
Vidal Icewine 2006 and Proprietor's 



Grand Reserve Riesling Icewine 
2006 both awarded Gold and Best of 
Class. 

For the winemaking process, 
Piccoli and Bond use a three-tiered 
gravity-flow system to maximize 
quality and minimize ipulation of 
the wine. Some of the most advanced 
equipment from around the world 
provides an extraordinary level of 
flexibility and control, including 
open-top fermenters, ultra-modern 
roto-fermenters, drainers, moveable 
bladder presses, and stainless-steel 
storage filitration tanks. 

And while most of the gold, silver 
and bronze-medal winning wines 



18 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 



that helped the winery triumph on 
the international stage are already 
chilling in private cellars around 
the world, a few select wines are still 
available at the Niagara winery or 
through the winery's wine club. 

Among them are: Proprietors' 
Grand Reserve Riesling Icewine 2006, 
Proprietors' Grand Reserve Meritage 
2005 and Proprietors' Grand Reserve 
Riesling 2006. 

Jackson-Triggs welcomes visitors 
to its winery, where wine lovers can 
taste the much lauded wines. At 
this striking architecturally designed 
facility, visitors are invited to explore 



every aspect of in small, expertly 
guided tours. This experience 
concludes with a tasting in the 
boutique or at the Grand Reserve 
Tasting Bar. 

In the Tasting Gallery overlooking 
the vineyard, visitors can unwind 
and enjoy sensational food and wine 
experiences. The winery also plays 
host to some of Niagara's most unique 
events, from "Savour the Sights" (an 
interactive progressive dinner) to 
live performances featuring talented 
performers under the stars in the 
winery's open air amphitheatre. ♦ 





MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 19 



ART 



STORMY WEATHER 

The Artist: Sue Miller 




Solace (Oil on canvas, 36" by 48". $3,000) 



Sue Miller's brooding studies of turbulent seas and 
stormy skies are inspired by the landscapes of New- 
foundland, a part of the world she has fallen in love 
with in recent years. The province's harsh beauty, its cha- 
otic weather as well as its welcoming spirit have become 
metaphors for Miller's personal view of a seething yet ulti- 
mately benevolent universe. 

In particular, the horizon, the place where land and sea 
meet the sky, has emerged as the focal point of her work. 
"I have always been inspired by landscape, not only 
for its obvious beauty, but for the many metaphors found 
in the joining of land, sky and water," she says. 

The Newfoundland paintings evoke an elemental energy 
that is unsettling, even disturbing, and yet is charged with 

20 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 



hope and beauty. Always, beyond the storm, there is light 
and the promise of peace. 

"My creative process is inseparable from my life. It can be 
quite chaotic at times ... but it is from that chaos that the 
creative spirit is nurtured." 
Cecily Ross 

Sue Miller lives and works in Creemore, Ont. Her work is on 
view at The Mad and Noisy Gallery, Creemore, Ont, The Up- 
stairs Gallery, 87B Huronontario St., Collingwood, Ont, and 
The Leyton Gallery, St. John's, Newfoundland. Prices range 
from SI 50 for a 6" by 6" canvas to S4,000 for 4' by 6' canvas. 
www.sueamiller.com ♦ 




for the real I CLSilOVt 



in your li 





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ON THE ROAD WITH 



The 2009 

RANGE ROVER Sport 

What could be more fun than taking the whole family 
for a drive - in a snow storm? 




22 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 




MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 23 



AUTOMOVTIVE 




hen I pulled out of the Mlssissauga car dealer- 
/ ship on a grey day this winter, it seemed like 
a perfect afternoon to test drive the new 2009 
Range Rover Sport. The sky was clear, the streets a little 
wet and salty, but hey it was January after all. 

So, with the family onboard, it was time to head north 
and really put this super-charged baby through its pac- 
es. As we headed up Airport Road on my way to Wasaga 
Beach, the weather started to close in, and by the time 
we pulled onto the back roads of cottage country it was 
snowing quite hard. 

But the Range Rover proved to be made for winter driv- 
ing. It was fantastic with the adjustable traction and dif- 
ferent four-wheel drive modes that could handle ice or 
deep snow with the turn of a knob. 

And the navigational system meant that we were never 
going to get lost no matter how bad the whiteouts. 

My six- and nine-year-old daughters loved the sound 
system. I put AC/DC's Highway to Hell in the CD player 
and cranked it up, and there we were bucking snow drifts 
and singing our hearts out. 

In the end it wasn't really a highway to hell, it was 
more like a touch of heaven. This Ranger Rover Sport 
looks good covered in snow and salt and cleans up real 
well to take the Theatre. ♦ 



2009 RANGER ROVER SPORT 
AT A GLANCE 



Models: 


2009 V8 


2009 V8 




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Supercharged 


Starting MSRP 


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$110,800 


Engine 


4.4-litre, 


4.2-litre, 




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400-hp V8 



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Six-speed adaptive automatic transmission with 

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Nine-airbag Supplemental Restraint System (SRS) 
710 Watt, 14 speaker harman/kardon L0GIC7 audio system 
Electronic Parking Brake (EPB) 

Colour touchscreen DVD-based GPS satellite navigation system 
Personal Telephone Integration System with Bluetooth© 

technology 
Onboard rearview camera 

www.landrover.ca 



24 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE d DESIGN 





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RESORT 




The Islands 

that time forgot 



. 



Diving, fine dining and drinks on the veranda, luxury meets adventure in Cayman 
by Kelly Gray 




Dinner al fresco at Hemingways By The Sea . . 

on Crand Cayman overlooking the spectacular Seven 

Mile Beach where the sunsets rival the cuisine. 



RESORT 




• 



Only those who have walked 
along her beaches can under- 
stand the rhythm of the Cay- 
man Islands. Nowhere else will you 
find such sunsets. Imagine cocktails 
on an oceanfront veranda before sit- 
ting down to a meal where only the 
view rivals the cuisine. Imagine days 
spent scuba diving at some of the 
world's best diving sites, where the 
ocean floor and island walls form a 
kaleidoscope of corals, sponges, shal- 
low reefs and schooling fish. 



Stingray City, widely regarded 
as "the world's best 12 foot dive", 
is a rare opportunity to touch 
and interact with more than two- 
dozen Atlantic Southern Sting- 
rays in their natural habitat. Non- 
divers can take in attractions that 
include the Queen Elizabeth II Bo- 
tanic Park and Boatswain's Beach, 
the new home of the Cayman Tur- 
tle Farm, but everyone will want to 
take in the Cayman Islands' official 
pastime: relaxing. And after dark, 



there is plenty of live entertainment, 
nightclub and theatre. 

Mysterious, picturesque, luxurious, 
the Cayman Islands were first sighted 
by European explorers in 1503. Once 
known as "the islands that time for- 
got," the West Indian destination, 
which consists of Grand Cayman, 
Cayman Brae and Little Cayman, has 
now become a world leader in tour- 
ism and financial services, the islands' 
two main industries. George Town 
on Grand Cayman is the capital and 



28 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 



www.xezo.com 



For a limited lime. Xezo is offering the Architect 
limited-edition watch for just S665.00 USD. To 
order this finely handcrafted timepiece, visit 
the manufacturer's Website at www.Xezo.com. 





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EZO 



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Luminous hands and markers 




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Grand Cayman's luxurious Ritz-Carlton resort. 



English is the prevailing language. 

The Cayman Islands offer some of 
the world most luxurious accommo- 
dations. Along the sandy reaches of 
Seven Mile Beach on Grand Cayman 
visitors can choose from such luxuri- 
ous accommodation as Grand Cay- 
man Marriott Beach Resort, The Reef 
Resort, Grand Cayman Beach Suites 
and the tropical Westin Casuarina 
Resort. At Compass Point Resort, an 
Ocean Frontiers Dive Resort, serious 
divers can stay in one of the resort's 



18 condominium units. For the ulti- 
mate in luxury, Cayman lovers can 
purchase one of the Ritz-Carlton Deck 
Houses: five-bedroom, five-bath gated 
single family homes each located on 
a private island with full access to the 
amenities of the fabulous Ritz-Carlton 
(private butler service, luxury boat 
and private dock). These gorgeous 
Deck Houses, crafted from natural 
wood, native stone and shells, are de- 
signed by critically-acclaimed Pamela 
Hughes of Hughes Design Associates 



and Los Angeles based lighting de- 
signer Paul Ferrante. 

Still largely undiscovered by bud- 
get developments, Cayman remains 
the place to experience unspoiled 
luxury among lush natural surround- 
ings and striking, pastel hued archi- 
tecture. Though the islands are the 
quintessential playground for the 
rich and famous, they also qualify as 
a little bit of paradise for the discern- 
ing traveller yearning to get away 
from it all. ♦ 



30 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 




Above: Ocean breezes waft over a table for four at Hemingway's on Grand Cayman. 
Below: The Club condominiums on Little Cayman. 




MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 31 




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The palm-fringed swimming pool at Grand Cayman Beach Suites 
opens onto soft, white-sand beaches. 



32 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 



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MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 33 



A Canadian T\ 

Architecture & Design 



Magazine 



A'RCHrrEcruRE Resign 




Features only the best in Canadian architecture, design 
and home products. Published bimonthly, each issue 
features innovative products for today's luxury home 
and provides readers with design ideas through featured 
projects from top architects, interior designers and 
builders. 

Canadian Architecture Si Design Magazine covers 
subjects and trends that reflect the varied styles of 
today's luxury homes. 



SUBSCRIBE TODAY! 

One Year- 6 issues $18 

Two Years ~ 1 2 issues $18 

March/April, May/June, July/August, September/October, November/December, January/February 

visit www.cadmag.ca 

Canadian „^» «"«uian I ADrunn, Canadian . *w,, ca *>ad\ak 

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36 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 



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prepare your favorite hot drink - coffee, cap- 
puccino, crema or tea 
Just $189.99 at Sears or visit 
www. tassimo. com 




DRINK TO ME 

Here is a stylish alternative to those utilitarian 
water filtration systems we're used to. Shaped 
like a life-giving vessel, the Aquaovo Ovopur 
sits on your kitchen counter and, like a spar- 
kling mountain spring, provides pure filtered 
water for the whole family. The innovative 
offline gravitational system is an ecologically 
friendly solution to water quality in urban ar- 
eas. Prices start at S689. Visit www.aquaovo.com 
for more information. 



TOP DRAWER 
Free up counter space with the new Sharp 
Insight Pro Microwave Drawer. It's the first 
microwave that fits under your kitchen coun- 
ter where it's immediately accessible and 
much easier to reach than overhead models. 
The drawer is also perfect for kitchen is- 
lands, wet bars and open-plan kitchens. The 
sleek stainless-steel finish and angled touch 
controls make it the ultimate in microwave 
design. It's about time. 
$1,075 at www.sharp.ca 



BEAUTY THAT'S COUNTER DEEP 

At last a French-door refrigerator that doesn't stick out into the room 
and yet has ample interior space to cater to the biggest family on the 
block. No more science projects lost in the back of this baby. The newest 
thing in refrigerators from KitchenAid is conveniently counter-deep and 
a mind-blowing 72 inches wide. It also features a bottom freezer with 
a narrow door swing that won't get in the way of a team of cooks. And 
its wide refrigerator shelves have no interior divisions, allowing greater 
space for wider items, such as cookie sheets, baking pans and serving 
trays. Prices range from $2,649 to $2,949 atwww.kitchenaid.com 




MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 38 



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HOUSE TREASURES 




COCOA PUFFER 

Miele's gorgeous washer/dryer combo is already the 

hottest thing in laundry room design, and now it's 

available in delicious, mouth-watering chocolate 

brown. But color isn't everything; this duo performs 

as beautifully as it looks. Special sensors automatically 

determine the size of each load and adjust water levels. 

The large door, angled drum and LED lighting make 

loading and unloading a snap. Doing the laundry has 

never looked this good. 

Priced from $3,495 to $3,995 a pair, www.mieie.ca 



PRETTY IN PINK 

What? A video camera that's small enough to fit 

in your pocket. Kodak's Zi6 pocket video will let 

you capture unforgettable moments on film, and 

mom and dad (the dog? your best girlfriends?) 

will never know you're making a movie. 

Then pop out the USB key and upload your video 

straight to YouTube using built-in software. 

The Zi6's SD/SDHC card holds up to 32 GB. 

It's also available in red and silver. 

$179.95 at Staples and Best Buy. 

www.sharp.ca 




OVER THE CARPET 
What a ball vacuuming will be with the new 
Dyson DC25 Ball upright vacuum cleaner. In- 
stead of wheels the DC25 features a large roller 
ball that allows you to whirl around the living 
room with the effortlessness of a walk in space. 
No more pushing and pulling. The DC25 Ball is 
also certified asthma and allergy friendly, which 
means it has been scientifically proven to remove 
more allergens than conventional vacs. And it 
comes in this wicked shade of purple. Housework 

will never be the same. 
$699.99 at www.dysoncanada.ca 




40 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 




LONDON 

DOT (.,.[>: 



•PERFECTLY BALANCED" glass design by TOM DIXON 



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KITCHEN 



EUROPEAN 
GRANDEUR 



WORTHY OF ANY CASTLE IN 
SPAIN, THE FINISHES IN 
THIS kitchen by Downsview 
Kitchens contribute to its grand Euro- 
pean aura even as the provide a practi- 
cal working environment for the serious 
cook. Anchored by an imposing Scagli- 
ola stone mantelpiece, the room also 
features American black walnut floors, 
honed Everglades granite counters and 
cabinetry in a creamy glazed Latte finish. 

www.downsvinvkitdicnsx'om 





** 




42 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 



p» 




KITCHEN 



CLEAN 
CLASSICAL 



The piece de resistance in this 
BeauxArts kitchen by SieMatic is 
the vertical "stacked" pantry in 
dark maple at left with its slender glass 
cabinet doors and row of small drawers, 
six of which are really one large drawer. 
The rustic-looking stove features a con- 
temporary stainless-steel hood. Mean- 
while soft, grey base cabinets express 
classical design in a whole new way. 
www. binns. net 




44 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE h DESIGN 




KITCHEN 



ITALIAN 
INNOVATION 

Wow! would be an understated 
reaction to the Flux metallic 
purple kitchen from Scavo- 
lini. The unusual color is both playful 
and sophisticated. And the contempo- 
rary, even space-age, feel is further en- 
hanced by the bright lacquered finish 
on the counters, the brushed metal cup- 
board and drawer handles and the stun- 
ning breakfast bar with its solid metal 
support. 

www.saixvliiii.cum 




»■■' J" >,-s.-.v-— < ••- ■■ 




46 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 



TIME OUT 

with Sarah Richardson 




TELEVISION'S FAVORITE DESIGNER 
IS BUSY THESE DAYS WITH A NEW 
BABY AND A NEW SHOW 



Canada's design maven is at it again; this spring an- 
other of Sarah Richardon's makeover projects hits 
the small screen. Sarah's Cottage, a six-part HGTV 
series that tackles the renovation of her favorite home 
away from home, an island cottage that's a 20-kilometer 
boat ride from the mainland. 

Stay tuned as the host of such HGTV hits as design inc., 
Room Service and Sarah's House, and her team brave icy 
waters, black flies, shipping issues and the laid-back work 
ethic of cottage country to turn a little piece of paradise 
into an even better piece of paradise. 
Canadian Architecture & Design Magazine talked to Sarah 
about a few of her favorite things, her design vision and 
her plans for the future. 



Why did you choose interior design as a career? 

I didn't choose this profession. ..I thank fate every day that 
this career chose me. 

How would you describe your design vision? 

Every home, every room, and every client deserve a fresh 
concept. My job is to be inspired by the challenge and cre- 
ate solutions which are innovative, original and personal. 

What is your favorite decor item? 

A Molly Lamb Bobak painting 1 bought at a Sotheby's 
auction during a very tough business year to remind 
myself of what's important. It's a wonderful bright beach 
scene and it cheers me every time 1 look at it. 

What is your favorite gadget? 

My husband's iPod. It always plays just what I need to hear! 



48 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 



Exploring a social phenomenon known as...the barbecue." 

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What is your most exciting new purchase? 

A pair of sublime vintage pink and gold Murano glass lamps. 

If you could travel through time, what era would you most like to visit? 

I'd love to see the design and manufacturing of the Art Deco and Art 
Moderne period. Some wonderful influences still carry through in many of 
today's designs. 

How do you dress for success? 

Jeans and a jacket for job site visits, shooting and sourcing days, and 
dresses for evening. Heels, jewelery and a polished attitude for both. Diane 
von Furstenburg, Tory Burch, Smythe and Nanette Lepore have a youthful, 
yet professional and fun approach which suits me perfectly. 

What are you reading right now? 

Lots of Dr. Seuss and Eric Carle 



<-a*-* 



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What is your ideal design project? 

I'd love to have free reign on a hotel so I could create rooms 
that feel welcoming and exciting instead of cookie-cutter. 



a learning adventure. I've got a lot on my plate so the best 
approach for me is to balance both speed and efficiency, and 
trust my gut - so far it hasn't steered me wrong. 



What is your dream vacation? 

Playing on the beach and in the pool with my kids and hus- 
band, afternoon naps, sunsets, fresh cuisine, and turndown 
service. 

How do you stay fit and relaxed? 

I chase 2 kids, rarely sit still, and enjoy fine wine. Summer 
water sports and winter snow sports are a treat when time 
permits these days. 

How do you manage to keep so many balls in the air? 
I'm a born multi-tasker and am honing my skills as a delega- 
tor. I don't second-guess my decisions and treat every day as 



What's the next project for your HGTV hit, Sarah's House? 

I'm embarking on the renovation and expansion of an 1880's 
brick farmhouse near Creemore for season 3 of Sarah's House. 

When does your new show Sarah's Cottage air? What's it 
about? 

It debuts Tuesday, March 31 at 9 p.m. on HGTV. It's a six- 
part mini-series that follows the transformation of our small, 
remote island cottage into a family retreat. We run the island 
entirely off the grid on solar power. Of course, when you are 
17 miles from the mainland on an island only accessible by 
plane or boat, lots can and will go wrong. ♦ 



MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 51 



POWERHOUSE 

Designers 



Named for an Irish expression meaning "the 
job's done," Vancouver's Bob's Your Uncle Design 
prides itself on its many con do, apartment and 
town house -decorating projects. In this issue, 
however, founding partners, Ada Bonini and 
Cheryl Broadhead, tackle their first-ever house 
renovation, giving a Burnaby, B.C., home, the 
distinctive aura of a boutique hotel 

Unit 307, 375 West 5tli Ave., Vancouver. 
604-801-5330. www.byudesign.com 




Ada Bonini and Cheryl Broadhead 
Bob's Your Uncle Design 




^ 



Combine David Powell's commitment to the 
modernist esthetic with Fenwick Bonnell's eye for 
off-beat stylish solutions and you have a design 
marriage made in heaven. In this issue, the pair 
transforms a woodsy Muskoka cottage into an 
urbane home-away-from-home for a family that 
likes to play but likes to do it in style. 

236 Davenport Rd., Toronto. 416-964-6210. 
www.powellandbonnell.coin 



Fenwick Bonnell and David Powell 
Powell & Bonnell 



Restraint and elegance are the central princi- 
pals evoked in Robert Ledingham's painstaking 
and detailed approach to residential interiors. 
Everything in the gorgeous home on Vancouver's 
north shore featured in these pages, from the 
indoor swimming pool to the state-of-the-art me- 
dia room is the result of Ledingham's meticulous 
attention to detail. 

125 East 4th Avenue, Vancouver. 604-874-4900. 
www.ledingliain.com 




Robert Ellingham 

Ledingham Design Consultants 



52 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 



Lori Morris loves beautiful things whether they 
come together in a contemporary kitchen or a 
colonial living room. But her special affinity for 
the grace and luxury of French Country styling is 
especially evident in the project detailed in this 
issue. Under her direction a spacious Toronto 
condominium acquires the look and feel of a 
manor house in central Paris. 

189 DuPontSL, Toronto. 416-972-1515. 





Lori Morris 

Lori Morris Design 



Staying small allows Vancouver designer 
Mitchell Freedland to remain true to his unique 
vision. That includes clean and classic interiors 
that are both sustainable and timeless in their 
appeal. The Vancouver condo in this issue, with 
its breathtaking views and stunning relationship 
with sea and sky is proof of his artistry. 

6 East rd Ave., Vancouver. 604-733-3600. 
www.mitchell-freedland-design.ca 



Mitchell Freedland 
Mitchell Freedland Design 



An architect as well as an interior designer, Tay- 
lor Hannah's reverence for classical buildings is 
evident in all her work. But that love is combined 
with a contemporary respect for the crisp beauty 
of modern materials. 

Every aspect of the Toronto home included in 
these pages is a reflection of her firm commit- 
ment to beauty that will endure for a lifetime. 

515 Davenport Rd., Toronto. 416-920-7899. 
www.taylorhannaharcliitect.com 




Dee Dee Taylor Hannah 
Taylor Hannah Architect 



MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 53 



POWERHOUSE 



A Burnaby reno designed by BYU's Ada Bonini 
blends formality with family fun 



Text by 

Sheree-Lee Oslon 
Photography by 
Ed White 
Interior Design by 

W. .. . ... Bob's Your Uncle 

hen they drew up their 
wish list for the reno of 
this three-level home in 
Burnaby's chic Capitol Hill area, 
the owners wanted the impossible: 
a boutique-hotel-style space that is also kid-friendly. 

But Ada Bonini of Vancouver's BYU Design (byudesign.com) pulled 
it off. Using glamorous but tough materials such as leather, white oak 
and stone, they created an elegant, multipurpose environment that 
is equally welcoming to toddlers, dogs, dinner guests - or a bunch of 
guys watching hockey in the family room. 

This is the first house project for the firm, which Bonini launched 
together with partner Cheryl Broadhead in 2003, though the pair have 
decorated several condominium residences. The name, BYU Design, 
actually started out as "Bob's Your Uncle Design." Bonini's Scottish 
husband came up with it and it stuck. "We wanted a name that was 
fun," Bonini says. "Because fun is important to us. It's about a work-life 
balance." 

Balance is also a major priority of the Burnaby clients. As high- 
powered professionals with two preschoolers, this is a couple who 
needed a place to kick back and relax. Hence the family room with the 
built-in flat screen TV, leather Natuzzi sofa, ecru leather Barcelona chairs 
and faux leather walls. ("They're very convincing," says Bonini.) 

The family also wanted a showpiece home that fits their professional 

54 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 





The staircase in the high-ceilinged foyer 
American walnut and framed with sheets of tempe 
glass. Beyond, linen-look wallpaper and dark oak 
paneling give the dining room an air of intimacy. 



MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 55 



The living room's soothing palette of 
beige, taupe and sandy hues is a study 
in harmony. A creamy marble coffee 
table complements the sleek limestone 
fireplace. 



profile - he is president of marketing 
for a large Vancouver development 
company; she's vice-president of a 
national brokerage company focusing 
on commercial properties. 

First impressions matter to them, 
and indeed, the impressive two-storey 
entrance foyer sets the tone for the 
entire ground level, with creamy Bella 
limestone flooring and a staircase 
in warm American walnut walled 
by sheets of thick tempered glass. 
A stunning blown-glass chandelier, 
chosen by the couple, hangs from an 
oak barrel-vaulted ceiling, completing 
the sense of occasion. 

The foyer looks directly through 
a wide opening into the elegant 
dining room, which features dark 
oak walls alternating with linen-look 
wallpaper. While the foyer feels airy, 
the dining room is intimate, a space 
to linger over home-cooked dinners 
with friends and family under the 
cream reverse coffered ceiling and 
an ultra-cool sparkly horizontal light 
fixture hanging low over the custom 
dark wood table. 

The living room is also open to the 
entrance hall, situated on the other 
side of the staircase. To create flow 
and airiness, elements are repeated 
here: the same limestone flooring 
continues throughout the main level 
of the home, and a similar coffered 
ceiling enhances the geometry of the 
space. 

The living room packs a glamorous 
punch: mirrored cabinets and a round 
mirror set off the sleek limestone of 
the mantelpiece, the creamy marble 
of the big square coffee table, and 
warm chenille upholstery of the 
tailored sofa and club chairs. 

With soft pot lighting throughout 
the room casting a warm glow, the 
beiges, taupes and sandy hues blend 
in a harmonious palette that is both 
classical and feels inspired by nature. 

56 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 





MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 57 



"I was trying to convey subtle texture 
and warmth in a neutral tone," 
Bonini says. 

In the powder room, the same 
creamy Bella limestone as the floor 
continues up the wall to enhance 
the boutique- hotel feel. The ledge 
is white oak, as is the vanity, which 
is topped with a round glass vessel 
sink. 

Working in the warm oak-lined 
kitchen, meanwhile, is a little like 
being inside a wooden bento box. The 
custom cabinetry runs floor to ceiling, 
with niches above the cupboards to 
display collected treasures. 

The large central island was 
designed to enhance clan gatherings, 
which often converge on the kitchen. 
"She's of Italian descent and cooking 
is quite social for her family," Bonini 
says. With a white composite stone 
countertop, two sinks, seating for 
four, and a built-in wine fridge and 
extra dishwasher, the island is a 
highly efficient centre of operations 
for home entertaining, which the 
couple loves to do. 

Once the party's over, of course, 
it's important to get some shut- 
eye. And the ultimate test of the 
house's boutique hotel feel is the 
couple's bedroom. Bonini designed 
a white oak floating platform bed 
to maximize floor and circulation 
space. Made up in crisp Restoration 
Hardware bedding, it is utterly 
inviting. The nightstands float as 
well, allowing the room to breathe, 
and have wall-mounted sconces to 
maximize bedside table space. 

But the most innovative element 
is the custom wall paneling in faux 
mohair. It creates a cozy, cosseted 
space, insulated from the noises of 
the household, and one hopes, the 
cares of the world. At night, from 
their hilltop perch, they can look out 
from their bedroom balcony at the 
lights of Vancouver below them. 

"The view is stunning up there," 
Bonini says. "It sparkles at night and 
in the day they can see the mountains 
and the ocean." 

Talk about having it all.* 




A round glass vessel sink and white oak cabinetry give the powder room a boutique- 
hotel feel. The walls are the same Bella limestone as the floor. 



Bob's Your Uncle Design 

604.801.5330 
byudesign.com 



58 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 



BALANCING ACT 




MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 59 




Faux leather walls in the family room add depth anH i 

comfort of the ecru Barcelona chairs and leather N^B i; it] li I 

the platform bed floats against a custom wall of faifl ,..i. 



60 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 




MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 61 




Text by ( 
Photography b w 

lilip Castlet 

-chitecture 
Taylor Hannah A. 



n a large corner lot in one of 
Toronto's fine old neighbor- 
hoods sits a grand house that 
looks for all the world as " 
been there for decades. A 
cular drive curves around to the im- 
posing stone portico. Pyramidal oak 
trees stand guard in front of banks of 



62 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 




MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 63 




10-foot tall windows. A monolithic 
limestone chimney rises from the 
rooftop with Dickensian authority. 

But a closer look reveals that the 
7,000 square foot, 4-bedroom man- 
sion is an imposter, designed and built 
by architect Dee Dee Taylor Hannah 
(www.taylorhannahachitect.com) 
just four years ago to suit the needs 
of a bustling family, a family whose 
lifestyle is firmly rooted in the here 
and now, but whose sensibility leans 
toward the elegance of an earlier era. 
The house, at first, looks very much 
like a traditional Forest Hill manor, 
but in fact it is much cleaner, crisper 
and way more contemporary. 

"I don't do pseudo or cookie-cutter 
recreations of historical styles," says 
Taylor Hannah of her architectural 
work. "I look to history and then in- 
terpret it in a modern way." And with 
this house, thanks to the use of such 
up-to-date materials as the zinc roof, 
aluminum windows and commercial 
brick facing, she has succeeded. 

"You can't really tell," she says, 
"whether it was built last year or 35 
years ago." 

Still, when pressed, Taylor Hannah 
admits that the building is a contem- 
porary take on an Italian palazzo, 
what she calls a "courtyard house." 
The impressive facade actually forms 
reverse "U" that wraps around a pri- 
vate outdoor inner sanctum, com- 
plete with patio, swimming pool, hot 
tub and an outdoor living room with 
a fireplace and upholstered seating. 

The long axial pool, perfect for do- 
ing early morning laps, is separated 
from the more languorous hot tub 




Modeled on an old-world Italian palazzo, the house's three wings embrace a central 
courtyard that is home to a swimming pool and hot tub. Above left, a circular drive 
curves to the imposing stone portico. 



64 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 




MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 65 




by a stepping-stone bridge made of 
the same Credit Valley limestone as 
the courtyard floor. Directional light- 
ing with its narrow upward beams 
and warm downward floods add to 
the feeling of intimacy. The outdoor 
room to the left has the effect of blur- 
ring the boundary between indoors 
and out. 

As much as possible, Taylor Han- 
nah has aimed for a light, airiness in 
her building design, something sel- 
dom found in the mansions of an ear- 
lier era. The tall windows throughout 
bring in maximum light to the spa- 
cious rooms with their 12- foot-high 
ceilings. "The interior has a gallery- 
like feel with lots of wall space," says 
Taylor Hannah, adding that the close 
relationship between the indoor and 
outdoor spaces was inspired by Cali- 
fornian design. 

Taylor Hannah's contribution to 
the interior is evident in the kitchen 
and bathroom areas of the courtyard 
house; the firm was recently asked to 
add its imprint to what are strategic 
areas of any home. 

Starting with His and Hers master 
bathrooms, the architect/designer 
created rooms that reflect the clients' 
unique personalities. The feminine is 
not always associated with contempo- 
rary design, but the Hers bathroom, 
while incorporating such traditional 
features as a crystal chandelier, shad- 
ed wall sconces and silver gilt mirrors, 
is nevertheless clean and free of un- 
necessary embellishment. "It's not all 
carved and crazy like a lot of girlish 




66 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 




MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 67 









His (top left) and Hers (bottom left) dressing rooms cater to the owners' sartorial 
needs. Above right, His bathroom is the epitome of masculinity. Below right, a girls' 
bath sparkles with feminine charm. 



rooms," says Taylor Hannah. 

Instead, the feminine is expressed in 
the gentle curve of the vanity niche, 
the womb-like roundness of the un- 
der-mounted tub and the graceful 
rolled back of the upholstered stool. 
The result is understated yet elegant. 
Warm blue accents, Taylor Hannah's 
favorite color, are fresh and clean, 
but never cold. Blue-white stone on 
the tub surround and bright marble 
floors give the bathroom a soft float- 
ing aura. 

"I like the contrasting curviness 
of the room," says Taylor Hannah, 
"in what is essentially a square, lin- 
ear house" 

Compare that to the His bathroom, 
a study in spare masculinity with its 
frameless mirror and rectangular van- 
ity in polished mahogany, a combi- 
nation that is saved from starkness by 
the back-painted glass walls. The tech- 
nique that adds depth and an almost 
luminescent sheen to the room. 

Taylor Hannah's touch also extends 
to the couples' generous walk-in clos- 
ets: His in dark wood with a comfy 
leather ottoman, Hers painted white 
with ample storage for an impressive 
shoe collection. Both are warmed un- 
derfoot by soft and practical cream- 
colored broadloom. 

That same practicality extends to 
the decidedly contemporary kitch- 
en. The Bellini cabinets in buttery 
sycamore are framed in stainless 
steel. Polished black granite coun- 
tertops and floors of gTey stone laid 
on staggered joints gleam under 
modernistic version of a chandelier. 
The blonde, black and grey tones 
are pulled together into a harmo- 
nious whole by the multi-colored 
mosaic tiled backsplash. But the 
overall modern effect is softened by 
the contrasting feature of traditional 
plaster cornices at the ceiling. 

"What I like," says Taylor Hannah, 
"is this juxtaposition of old and new. 
I believe in function, but I also believe 
in beauty. If I can make them work 
together, then I've succeeded."* 

Taylor Hannah Architect Inc. 

416.920.7899 
taylorhannaharchitect.com 



68 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 




A curved vanity and inviting oval bathtub with soft, blue inset panels make 
this graceful bathroom the private domain of the lady of the house. 






MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 69 



immj^ 




A tufted, backless sofa (far 
right) highlights the theme 
of updated Victorian chic ir 
a cozy grouping of texture 
furnishings in soothing 
neutral colors. 



70 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 



LET 
THE 

SUN 

SHINE 

IN 




SOOTHING COLOURS, WARM TEXTURES AND 
DESIGNER LORI MORRIS'S LIGHT TOUCH 
TRANSFORM A TORONTO CONDO 



Text by 

Mickey Goodman 
Photography by 
John Trigiani 
Interior Design by 
Lori Morris 



UNDER ordinary circum- 
stances, clients rarely leave 
the design process entirely to 
the professional. Not so with a Toron- 
to couple who were among designer 
Lori Morris's (Lori Morris Design Inc.) 



first clients and had worked with her 
on three other homes. "Lori knows 
exactly what we like better than we 
do," the wife laughs. "We just told her 
to make it exciting." 

That shouldn't have been much 
of a stretch for a condo located in 
Toronto's luxurious new Regency 
Yorkville, an art deco-style building 
designed by architects Turner, Fleis- 
cher with the assistance of interior 
decorator Mike Niven. The complex 
offers valet parking, concierge ser- 
vice and even a building butler. But 
it didn't take Morris long to realize 
that some changes would be needed 
to the home the couple calls "their 
last hurrah." 



"I didn't like the way the space was 
configured and knew they wouldn't 
either," Morris says. "Because we 
launched the project before the Re- 
gency was completed, we were able 
to work with the building's contrac- 
tors to manipulate the rooms for 
functionality and design." 

In the end, Morris was able to give 
the couple everything on their brief 
wish list: sunshiny rooms to bring 
the Toronto skyline indoors, a large 
dining room to entertain their many 
friends, a cozy media room, ample 
closet space and a color palette in 
warm neutrals punctuated with strik- 
ing black accents. 

The couple had total faith that 



MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 71 




Graceful archways and columns create a sense of intimacy and a feeling of openness at the same 
time. The dining room's black furnishings echo the wrought-iron chandelier and contrast with 
the beige and taupe hues in the adjoining rooms. 



^ 



Morris would work her magic. "Lori 
has an amazing capacity to envision 
the way a space will look at comple- 
tion before she even begins," the wife 
says. "She is absolutely brilliant." 

Layout was key. Morris, a 21-year 
veteran of the business, whose moth- 
er, Eve, works alongside her, divided 
the condominium into two distinct 
spaces with the bedrooms to the left 
of the entry and the living area to the 
right. Under her direction, her team 
began by installing coffered ceilings 
and classic columns with elaborate 
millwork throughout. Next came 
graceful archways, so skillfully ex- 
ecuted, they look as if they are part of 
the original floor plan. 

Always mindful that the devil is in 
the detail, Morris designed stunning 
glass and iron casement and pocket 
doors that add privacy and under- 
score the beauty of the architectural 
features. Since the existing electri- 
cal wiring didn't always coincide 
with Morris's furniture placement, 



lighting became one of her biggest 
challenges. She solved it with the 
liberal use of crystal wall sconces on 
the columns. 




The guest room/study, the first 
room visitors see, provides a glimpse 
of things to come. A massive built- 
in wall unit to the right of the bed 
includes a glass-shelved armoire for 
the couple's books and collectibles, 
cupboards for storage, shelving and 
a spacious computer desk that the 



wife uses as an office for her philan- 
thropic endeavors and assisting in the 
family business. Rich taupe wallpaper 
and cream Roman draperies soften 
the black furnishings and carpet. An 
eye-popping black lacquered chest 
trimmed in black patent leather that 
opens like a steamer trunk encourages 
guests to unpack and stay awhile. 

In contrast to the deep colors in the 
guest room/study, airy butternuts and 
beiges in the master bedroom and en- 
suite bath reflect the sun, and a spec- 
tacular crystal chandelier catches the 
moonbeams. But the room did present 
some design challenges - an awkward- 
ly placed support beam, a lack of wall 
space for the bed and another support 
beam in the center of the closet. To 
solve the triad of dilemmas, Morris's 
team created a padded floor-to-ceiling 
headboard that serves as a mini-wall 
for the bed, conceals the support beam 
and provides additional storage in the 
side bookcases. "Lori even customized 
the closet so we have three times as 



72 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 




MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 73 




74 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 




MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 75 





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much space," says the owner. 

The main hub of any home is a 
living room that is welcoming for 
guests and residents alike. To cozy up 
the space, Morris created four con- 
versation groups separated visually 
by columns and the antique wash 
Zeigler-style carpets that she terms, 
"art work for the floor." Her mother, 
Eve, whose expertise lies in helping 
Morris select the perfect accessories, 
furnishings, artwork and fabrics, sug- 
gested a melange of chenille, suede, 
leather and brocade. Added drama 
in the dining room came through 
Morris's use of dual-textured seating 
and black furnishings, echoed in the 
striking chandelier. 

In the adjacent galley kitchen, 
custom cabinetry with deep bronze 
hardware blends seamlessly into the 
overall design of the condo and dis- 
guises the pantry and freezer drawers. 
Bar stools allow guests to chat with 
the hostess during food preparation 
and still feel part of the party. But the 
showstopper is clearly the comfort- 
able eat-in area with its backlit bench 
upholstered in lush tufted chenille. 

The real test of any design project 
lies with the satisfaction of the hom- 
eowners and for the couple's fourth 
home, Morris delivered. "Once Lori 
began, we didn't see the space again 
until it was completed," the wife 
says. "Then, she gave us a marvelous 
presentation. It was like receiving a 
birthday present that far exceeded 
even our highest expectations. This 
is an exciting home, one that reflects 
exactly who we are." ♦ 



Lori Morris Design Inc. 
416.972.1515 

lorimorrisdesign. ca 



416.972.1515 




78 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 



Custom-made furnishings cluster around a limestone-clad fireplace giving the 
glass-wailed living room a cozy gull's-eye view of the sunset-streaked sky. 



MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 79 




Text by 

Rachel Hunter 

Photography by 

Ed White Photographies 

Interior Design by 

Mitchell Freedland 



In this seaside penthouse 
mere humans enjoy the same 
breathtaking scenery as the 
seagulls. Mountains, ocean and sky 
fill the senses, invited in by towering 
walls of glass and an interior palette 
that mirrors the colours of the sand 
and surf below. 

Perched atop a luxury condominium 
building in West Vancouver, the 
two-storey, 4,000-square foot 
condominium is a private, peaceful 
retreat ideal for entertaining an 
intimate gathering of friends or just 
cocooning, says Mitchell Freedland, 
of Vancouver's Mitchell Freedland 
Design. Overlooking stunning English 



Bay, the home revels in a southwestern 
exposure that is maximized wherever 
possible by floor-to-ceiling windows. 

Freedland, who has garnered awards 
for his work across North America, 
was the lead designer on the building 
during its 2007 construction. 

"We were lucky to be in on the 
project from the beginning, and so 
were able to work with the builder 
on several key components for the 
space," he says. The main floor's open 
plan allows easy entertaining, with 
the living room, dining room and 
kitchen all flowing naturally from 
one end of the home to another. 

Surrounded by glass on three 
sides, the living room, like most of 
the residence, is designed to capture 
the views. It includes custom-made 
furnishings created by Freedland's 
firm. "Furniture design is part of 
what we love to do," Freedland 
notes, adding that it enables him 
to truly partner a home's structural 
personality with its furnishings. The 
sofa and chairs clustered around the 
fireplace, even the lighting, were all 



created exclusively for the home. The 
Donghia chaise by the limestone-clad 
fireplace is the only exception. 

Another example of the firm's 
handiwork is the hall table stationed 
in the home's entryway. An adaptation 
of a 1938 design by Austrian furniture 
maker Paul T. Frankl, it recalls Art 
Deco's modernist aspirations using a 
21 st century favourite, zebra wood. The 
piece is a functional blend of old and 
new modernity finished with touches 
of ivory lacquer and brass inlays. 

The open dining room and kitchen 
can be as formal or as casual as an 
evening's activities might dictate. 
The spacious kitchen, with its island 
seating and Quartzite countertop, 
would shine as headquarters for a 
formal, catered dinner party, or a 
simple get-together over homemade 
pizza prepared in one of two Miele 
wall ovens (the third is a steam 
oven). A steaming cappuccino from 
the built-in espresso maker would 
accompany dessert. Adjacent to 
the kitchen, a climate-controlled, 
professionally-installed wine room 



80 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 




MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 81 




82 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 




holds up to 700 bottles. 

Freedland's intention was to 
create a space that was peaceful 
and harmonious, "easy on the eye, 
without jarring changes," he says. He 
began by using the same white oak 
flooring throughout the entire home, 
defining particular spaces, such as the 
entry, with area carpeting and rugs. 
All the cabinetry and panelling are 
made of a clear-stained satinwood, 
grown sustainably in South America. 
Wherever he could, he made use 
of natural materials with hues 
embracing the light and the sand 
outside. Hence, the home is bathed 
in the rich, organic tones of honey, 
topaz and driftwood. 

The main floor powder room, 
with its onyx vanity top and 
panelled walls, "is a rich jewel box," 
Freedland says. Tile choices for the 
two full bathrooms and one half- 
bath, as well as linens and paint 
schemes throughout the home, all 
serve the ultimate goal of uniformity 
and calmness. 

The master bedroom, the guest 
suite and walk-in closets, occupy the 




top floor of the building. 

"It's a totally private retreat floating 
above the entire ocean," Freedland 
says. "It's a spectacular space." Floor- 
to-ceiling glass soars to 16 feet on 
three sides, capturing the same views 
of Stanley Park, the Lions Gate Bridge 
and Mount Baker visible from the 
living room, which is directly below. 
The 300-square-foot deck perches 
right on the horizon, creating almost 
an infinity-like effect. 

A butterscotch-toned leather 
headboard is flanked by wall- 



mounted mirrors; they encourage 
light to move throughout the room 
no matter what the time of day. At 
night, darkness is achieved with 
motorized blackout shades. 

The master bath is urbane, serene 
and bathed in diffused light, thanks 
to a 10- by 10-foot wall of privacy 
glass. The rich swirls of the vanity's 
butter and cream-coloured onyx (the 
same onyx featured downstairs in the 
powder room), is the only element 
of the room suggesting motion; 
everything else speaks of stillness, 
especially the sophisticated Duravit 
bathtub (with faucets by Dornbracht), 
which reclines on its own in front of 
the glass wall. An oversized shower 
with a deluxe array of Grohe sprays 
complete the spa-like atmosphere. 

This well-feathered West Vancouver 
nest certainly accomplishes the goal 
of its acclaimed designer - that is, 
peace, literally, above it all. * 

Mitchell Freedland Design 
604.733.3600 
mitchell-freedland-design. ca 



MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 83 




84 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 




MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 85 




86 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 



Sophistication 
by the shore 

A RUSTIC GETAWAY IN THE MUSKOKAS GETS AN UPSCALE 
MAKEOVER BY BIG CITY DESIGNERS POWELL & BONNELL 




Text by Danny Sinopoli 
Photography by 
Ted Yarwood 
Interior Design by 
Powell & Bonnell 



Is there such a thing as 
"metropolitan rustic" style? If 
there wasn't before, there is now, 
as a luxuriously appointed two-level 
country home in Ontario's Muskoka 
region so elegantly demonstrates. 

For generations, families from 
Toronto have been drawn to the area 
for its pristine lakes and forested 
expanses. While some travel there to 
commune with nature and perhaps 
even rough it, others seek to create 
retreats with the same levels of comfort 
they enjoy in the city. The client who 
commissioned the Toronto design 
firm Powell & Bonnell to design and 



furnish a largely empty cottage on the 
shores of Lake Rosseau not long ago 
falls squarely in the latter camp. With 
its high-ceilinged rooms, magnificent 
fireplaces, fully appointed kitchen 
and striking custom furnishings, 
the 3,800-square-foot home with 
on-site gym and nearby boathouse 
isn't so much a weekend refuge as an 
extension of the client's city life in 
the middle of the woods. 

"We had worked on the client's 
home in Toronto and wanted to create 
a similar experience in the country," 
says Fenwick Bonnell, who oversaw 
the project with designer Albert 

MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 87 




88 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 




MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 89 




Limshue. Since the firm, which is 
renowned for its sophisticated urban 
interiors, had never tackled a cottage 
before, the logistics of working on 
a property in a remote location 
promised to be challenging, but the 
designers attacked the project with 
their typical meticulousness. 

After canvassing the site, which the 
designers described as being "eyebrow 
deep in snow" when they first saw it, 
they set out on a six-to-eight-month 
process that included designing 
custom furniture, incorporating some 
of the client's existing pieces into the 
scheme and establishing the proper 
framework for it all. 

"One of the first steps was to 
convince the client to paint out all 
the trim and walls," recalls Bonnell, 
who describes the "before" cottage 
as "cliche Muskoka, with pine 
everywhere." Doing so, he felt, would 
shift the focus to the soaring beamed 
ceilings on the main floor of the 
house and accentuate the sightline 

- perhaps the cottage's finest feature 

- from the front door of the home 



to the living room's massive picture 
windows and Lake Rosseau beyond. 

"It was really about walking in the 
door and being presented with a view 
of the lake and the hemlocks outside 
the windows," Bonnell's partner, 
David Powell, says. 

After the client agreed, the designers 
chose a handsome charcoal grey "to 
mitigate the effect of all the wood," 
Powell adds. It was used throughout 
the main floor, which also includes 
a kitchen and eating nook and 
extends into a separate dining room. 
The ceiling, as promised, was left 
untouched, allowing both it and an 
imposing stone fireplace with solid 
pine mantelpiece to dominate the 
main living room. 

To furnish this space, the designers 
introduced a coordinated mix of semi- 
antique and custom pieces, including 
a pair of signature high-back chairs 
for in front of the fireplace, a massive 
glass-topped coffee table and a boxy 
rectangular bench with woven leather 
seat. To ground the space, they laid 
a chic area rug sporting earth-toned 



stripes and a dark brown band. A 
large red fibreglass canoe - "one 
of the few pieces we kept from the 
original builder-owner," says Bonnell 
- hangs from the ceiling, lending 
both drama and an air of ruggedness 
to the room. 

"Our intention was to bust the 
cliches of many cottages through 
strong lines, simple shapes and 
natural fabrics and colors," Bonnell 
explains. "We also wanted to give 
the impression that all of the 
furniture had been accumulated over 
time by the client, not just brought 
in at once." 

In the adjoining kitchen and 
eating space, a similarly bespoke 
quality prevails. To illuminate the 
high-ceilinged kitchen, where the 
cabinetry and range hood were 
stripped of existing decorative 
flourishes and then painted a creamy 
white, Bonnell decked out the granite 
island top with two tall table lamps 
he found in an antique shop and 
spray-painted gun metal grey. For 
the eating nook, Limshue designed a 



90 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 




MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 91 




The breakfast nook's modem zinc-topped table and custom slatted bench bust the usual cottage cliches. Meanwhile the wooden bench 
with its leather cushion maintains a rustic tone. 





Dark furnishings and cream-colored walls in the upstairs bedrooms reverse the color 
scheme found in the rest of the cottage. The foot board of the master bed pops open to 
revel a flat-screened television. 



unique slatted banquette- "a modern 
interpretation of a church bench," as 
Powell describes it - to wrap around 
a modern zinc-topped table. 

"A banquette was tricky to install 
there because the windowsill is a 
low one," Powell says, adding that 
the open wood slats addressed 
that problem by creating a semi- 
transparent screen between the 
window and the seat. At the same 
time, the dark wood finish of the 
bench echoes the dark chocolate 
tone of the circular stained-pine table 
with distressed top in the adjoining 
dining room, which is surrounded 
on three sides by windows, "kind of 
like a pavilion," Bonnell says. 

"A rectangular table was originally 
in the room, but we went with a 
round one because it better suited 
the space," he adds. Rounding out 
the furnishings in the dining room 
are a series of rattan-like woven-paper 
armchairs and an elegant four-foot- 
tall hanging lantern from Powell & 
Bonnell's own furnishings line. 



92 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE d DESIGN 



On the other side of the cottage, 
the bedroom is the only room on 
the main floor that isn't painted 
grey. "We toned it down in there," 
says Bonnell, referring to the chalky 
cream color on the bedroom walls. 
The lighter, softer shade provides 
an effective backdrop for two of the 
owner's own pieces of furniture: a 
glass-panelled cabinet the design 
team moved from the living room to 
a reading nook in the bedroom and a 
dark wood headboard they enhanced 
with a custom - and very high-tech - 
new feature. 

"We designed the footboard to 
house the TV," Bonnell says. "A 
section of the top rises up with the 
TV underneath it." 

The primary TV-watching room, 
however, is located on the lower 
level of the cottage, which has a 
lower ceiling than the vaulted spaces 
upstairs but offers a direct walkout to 
the woods and lake outside. One of 
the main challenges for the designers 
in this room was an "ugly" salmon- 
colored stone fireplace that used 
to dominate it; after convincing 
the client and even the contractor 
conducting the work of what they 
felt had to be done, they addressed 
the unsightly yet very prominent 
feature by painting it white. 

"It's made of a porous, granular 
stone, so we had to coat it with 
concrete block filler and then paint 
it," Bonnell explains. "We also 
replaced an under-scale wood mantel 
with a larger piece." And the result? 
"The contractor was won over," 
Bonnell laughs. 

And how could he not be? As a focal 
point, the reworked fireplace now 
possesses a crisp new freshness and a 
sophisticated yet still rustic elegance, 
much like the cottage itself. 

"This was really our first cottage," 
Bonnell says of the project as a whole, 
"but we knew that we really didn't 
want to do a traditional cottage. It 
had to reflect our sensibility, have 
some sophistication." 

On that front, they certainly came 
through.* 

Powell & Bonnell 
416.964.6210 

powellandbonnell. com 






MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 93 




94 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 




Unifying 
Forces 



Meticulous attention to detail by designer Robert Ledingham 
lend heart and soul to a Vancouver home 



./. 





living room ceiling panels giving a se 
effect is created by the black countertd. 



Text by Janet Collins 
Photography by Janice Nicolay 
Interior Design by 
Robert Ledingham Design 



Glance out the windows, 
and you could be forgiven 
for thinking this gorgeous 
10,000-square-foot home is tucked 
into a rural setting. In fact, it is situ- 
ated in a residential neighbourhood 
on Vancouver's popular North Shore. 

"There are clearly areas of the home 
meant for entertaining," says interior 
designer Robert Ledingham, "but this 
is also a family home." Much of the 
success of the design is due to themes 
that have become signatures of Led- 
ingham's more than 40-year career: a 
largely neutral palette, meticulous at- 
tention to detail, and a sense of pro- 
portion that creates spaces that flow 
seamlessly together. 

The effect begins in the aptly 
named great room. Here, full-height 
windows form a conduit between the 
indoor and outdoor areas. 

At one end of the room, an open- 

MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 95 




96 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 





B 



k 




d fireplace adds a zen-like quality to the great room. 
Ledingham's neutral color palette provides a pleasing contrast to the wall of 
custom sapele cabinetry. 



MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 97 




98 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 




□ 



I 



I 





plan kitchen commands enough space 
for a dozen cooks. When the pantry door 
is shut, the back wall appears to be an un- 
interrupted expanse of sapele millwork. 
This echoes the opposite end of the great 
room with its wall of custom cabinets 
punctuated by a limestone-trimmed fire- 
place. Floating sapele panels suspended 
from the ceiling further unite the two ar- 
eas of the room, and strengthen the con- 
nection between indoors and out. 

"The ceiling panels also create a light- 
ing solution," notes Frank Ranieri, senior 
designer with Ledingham Design Con- 
sultants who worked on the project. The 
wood panels serve to offset banks of lights. 
"We could have installed recessed lights," 
says Ranieri, "but at 2,000 square feet the 
room was so large there would be holes 
all over the ceiling before we had enough 
light. The fixtures we installed are com- 
monly used in retail environments. They 




can be focused, so they are very versatile." 

The large windows running down the 
side of the space create plenty o natural 
light, which travels deep into the main lev- 
el thanks to the installation of translucent 
panels on either side of the room's entry. 
Reminiscent of shoji screens, the panels in- 
corporate a gauze insert between the panes 
of glass. As such, the panels mimic materials 
found throughout the great room, such as 
the woven fabric in the custom sofa and the 
sides of the accompanying lounge chairs. 

Down the hall, another screen positioned 
outside the dining room picks up the tex- 
ture of the linen-clad doors of the custom- 
designed oak buffet. In addition to pro- 
viding much-needed storage space in the 
dining room, the green buffet front plays 
up the edging of the area carpet under the 
round mahogany dining table. The color 
here, and in the grass window shades is a 
reference to the outdoor environment. A 

MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 99 




100 I CANADIAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 




The media room's cloth-covered wall panels hide the mechanics of 
a state-of-the-art entertainment system. Orange and green accent 
pillows punctuate the massive 24-foot-long sofa. 



central light fixture incorporates the same ceiling lights 
used in the great room. 

The library and study occupy a single room at the op- 
posite end of the house, behind the great room. A sliding 
ladder aids access to upper shelves of the full-wall-height 
bookcases. A custom sofa and club chair provide seating 
in the library area. Behind the desk, large windows offer 
excellent views of the swimming pool below and the lush 
forest beyond. In addition to ample use of wood through- 
out the room, the two spaces are joined by a large area rug 
that covers much of the hardwood flooring. 

A floor-to-ceiling leather headboard creates a focal 
point in the master bedroom, which is located on the up- 
per level of the house. A custom table positioned over 
the bedside table runs the length of the wall beside the 
bed thereby reinforcing the generous size of that space. 
The master suite features a large dressing room with cus- 
tom built-in shoe and sweater storage space. The ample 




Wooden trusses 
pillars create an i 
entry way to the 
foot home. 



and stone 
mpressive 
10,000 square 



A dramatic floor-to-ceiling 
leather headboard is the focal 
point of the master bedroom. 
The custom bedside table 
extends the width of the 



ensuite, which boasts a large ottoman and a custom rug, 
adjoins the master bedroom or the dressing room via 
pocket doors. Four other bedrooms, two of which also 
have ensuite baths, round out the upper level. These are 
the children's rooms. The color theme of each room is 
highlighted by the inclusion of a playful piece of furni- 
ture such as the large tomato-shaped beanbag chair in the 
red-themed room. 

The lower floor might well be described as the play lev- 
el. This is the location of the pool and Jacuzzi, which are 
surrounded by walls of glass under a 20-foot-high wood 
ceiling. This level is also home to an exercise area, games 
room, cigar room complete with wine cellar, and a guest/ 
nanny suite. 

The games room looks onto the conservatory and opens 
into the media room. The guts of the entertainment sys- 
tem (speakers, etc.) are tucked behind cloth-covered wall 
panels (which also aid acoustics) and the projector is 
housed in the bulkhead. The massive 24-foot sofa is pos- 
sibly the largest piece of furniture Ledingham has ever 
designed. Brightly hued chairs and accent pillows create a 
playful energy, one that evokes the exuberance of a grow- 
ing family at home in a house designed just for them. ♦ 



Ledingham Design Consultants Inc. 

604.874.4900 
ledingham.com 



MARCH/APRIL 2009 I cadmag.ca I 101 





bragging rights 

Architects, 
Interior Designers 
and Builders 



* 



If you have a project that should be featured, this is your 
opportunity to appear within the pages of an upcoming issue: 



CANADIAN 



ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN 

Magazine 
Visit www.cadmag.ca for submission details. 



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1.877.254.3965 Fax: 905.851.4370 260 Jevlan Drive, Unit 3, Woodbridge, Ontario L4L 8B1 Canada 

info@mantelsofstone.com www.mantelsofstone.com 



Vorsprung durch Technik www.a 



GOOD 

Audi 



INTRODUCING THE NEW A4. A ZERO SEAM BETWEEN 
THE ROOF AND SIDE PANELS IS A TESTAMENT TO 
THE HIGH LEVEL OF CRAFTSMANSHIP ITS DIALS 
CLICK WITH A SOUND REMINISCENT OF PRECISION 
CLOCKWORK. AND THE PREMIUM BANG & OLUFSEN® 
SOUND SYSTEM IS A SHINING EXAMPLE OF THE 
QUALITY NE DEMAND IN EVERY ASPECT OF THE 
DRIVING EXPERIENCE. THE NEWA4 BRILLIANT. 




AutOWMU JOUWtftSTB 
A3BGCIA1IO* O* C«**D* 



AJAC'S 2009 BEST NEW LI 



'ER S50.000. 



©2009 Audi Canada. European model Audi A4 3.2 FSIguatiro Sedan shown wilh optional equipmenl. "Audi", "FSI", "A4", "quatlro", "Vorsprung durch Technik", and the four rings emblem are registered 
trademarks of AUDI AG. To tind out more about Audi, see your dealer, call 1-800-FOR-AUDI, or visit us at www.audi.ca.